Is it from grated coconut or coconut water? How is coconut sugar actually made?

 

 

Coconut Palm Sugar On Rustic Wooden Background
Coconut Sugar

We are always on the lookout for a healthier alternative to refined sugar and artificial sweetener. Coconut sugar is one such ingredient that fits beautifully in that category.

It has a low glycemic index which basically means that it does not make our blood sugar levels to peak and crash drastically like normal sugar does.

It is also unrefined so absolutely no chemicals are used in its processing and thus its natural goodness have not been stripped off.

Many people are aware that coconut sugar is healthy but there is still a lot of confusion regarding where does it come from.

Taking a clue from the name, many assume that it must be made from the coconut flesh or water.

No, the answer is neither of them.

Lets find out how Coconut Sugar is actually made.

Coconut sugar is actually made from the coconut sap which is obtained from the unopened spathe or coconut flower bud.

STEP 1: Coconut Sap Harvesting :

coconut-sap

A bud which has just burst or about to burst is selected for the extraction.

The outer sheath is peeled off, exposing the spikelets which are then tied down with a string.  About 3 mm is trimmed off the tip of the coconut bud at every collection.

A can is placed at the end of coconut bud in which the dripping sap gets gradually collected. This Coconut Sap is collected around twice or thrice a day.

The collected Coconut sap is then filtered to remove any suspended particles or impurities.

STEP 2: Boiling Of the Coconut Sap

boiling

The collected Coconut sap is then boiled in large woks for about 45 to 60 minutes till it changes into dark brown colored thick liquid.

STEP 3: Cooling

The thick liquid is then cooled by continuously stirring it. It turns to a light brown pasty mixture.  Eventually they will solidify into big lumps

STEP 4: Drying and sifting

This is the last step in the process wherein the lumps are sun dried and pounded to small granules.

It is then sifted and the fine granules are packed for shipping to your kitchen.

Hope you liked this article. If you would like to add more differences do mention the same in the comments section below.


ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Priya Photo

Priya Prakash, Co-Founder, Naturally Yours.

With over 7 years of experience in the organic industry, Priya is a strong believer in using healthy and easy to use alternatives in daily life. She passionately advises her friends, family and customers by sharing with them practical and easy ways to include healthy alternatives in their daily life.

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